She wanted to die, but she also wanted to live in Paris.

Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary (via isisthornes)

(Source: writingwillows, via imakesense)

If you think of a stylish white woman, especially when she is thin, minimal ornamentation and neutral colors and “effortless” hair can be considered part of her coolness, transpose the lack of ornamentation, neutral beiges and greys, and under-styled hair on a fat woman or even a fat woman of color and I bet your bottom dollar that many would find her appearance lacking, “sloppy” even.

I find this outrageously unfair because if you have read any fashion magazine since the mid-nineties, there has been a place for minimalism and under-styling.

Is this place only for thin, white, girls? I surely don’t think so!

The Politics of Looking “Sloppy” (via kawahineaihonua)

(via goosebumpsfitsandmalaria)

petites-choses:

@stegallsaurus basking in the sunshine http://ift.tt/1hhbFW6

petites-choses:

@stegallsaurus basking in the sunshine http://ift.tt/1hhbFW6

(Source: 70sblues, via opalinefeather)


Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

(Source: vintagegal, via infinitepet)

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Yves Montand watching Marilyn Monroe who’s watching Arthur Miller who’s watching Simone Signoret who’s watching Yves Montand

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Yves Montand watching Marilyn Monroe who’s watching Arthur Miller who’s watching Simone Signoret who’s watching Yves Montand

Today the individual has become the highest form, and the greatest bane, of artistic creation. The smallest wound or pain of the ego is examined under a microscope as if it were of eternal importance. The artist considers his isolation, his subjectivity, his individualism almost holy. Thus we finally gather in one large pen, where we stand and bleat about our loneliness without listening to each other and without realizing that we are smothering each other to death. The individualists stare into each other’s eyes and yet deny each other’s existence. We walk in circles, so limited by our own anxieties that we can no longer distinguish between true and false, between the gangster’s whim and the purest ideal.

Ingmar Bergman. (via shanakht)

(via goosebumpsfitsandmalaria)

polkanots:

brando-calrissiane:

polkanots:

trends women should avoid 2014: men’s opinions 

I’m sorry, but I would have to disagree with you. Our opinions are nothing more than opinions, you have the choice to listen or disregard them. It is always inevitably ones choice to listen to another.

If you would like to retaliate, I would like to hear what you want to say

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(via gethustle)

aleyma:

A.Y. Jackson, Frozen Lake, Early Spring, Algonquin Park, 1914 (source).

aleyma:

A.Y. Jackson, Frozen Lake, Early Spring, Algonquin Park, 1914 (source).

(Source: filmchrist, via fairweathered)

partia:

San Francisco 2014

partia:

San Francisco 2014

(via craftbully)

An Infinite List of Favorite Collections - Valentino F/W 2014-15 RTW

(via infinitepet)

Come on, baseball season.

(via infinitepet)

(Source: goosebumpsfitsandmalaria)

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via fajazo)

(Source: daniellemertina, via gethustle)

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